Botox and Dysport:

Drugs injected into facial muscles to smooth out present wrinkles, and keep future wrinkles from developing by reducing muscle activity. The most common areas treated are the area just above the nose, the "crow's feet" area around the eyes, and the forehead. The procedure is done in the office with little to no pain, and the effects last 3-5 months.

Fillers:

Acne:

A skin condition characterized by the excess production of oil from sebaceous glands in which the hair follicles become plugged

Actinic Keratosis:

A lesion on the skin, typically on the upper portion of the head, characterized by discolored, thickened or scaly growths of keratin, caused by exposure to the sun; common in fair-complected people of a certain age. They are precancerous

Allergic Skin Reaction: An allergic reaction is the body's way of responding to an "invader." When the body senses a foreign substance, called an antigen, the immune system is triggered. The immune system normally protects the body from harmful agents such as bacteria and toxins. Its overreaction to a harmless substance (an allergen) is called a hypersensitivity reaction, or an allergic, reaction.

-Anything can be an allergen. Common dust, pollen, plants, medications, certain foods, insect venoms, animal dander, viruses, or bacteria are examples of allergens.

-Reactions may occur in one spot, such as a small skin rash or itchy eyes, or all over, as in a whole body rash.

-A reaction may include one or several symptoms.

Basal Cell Carcinoma: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread.

But though basal cell carcinomas are rarely fatal, they can cause extensive damage to surrounding tissue and bone if they're not removed. Basal cell carcinomas also have a high recurrence rate; if you've had one basal cell carcinoma, you have a good chance of developing another within five years.

Birthmark Statistics:

-1 in 10 children are born with a vascular birthmark

-1% of children born with a vascular birthmark (1 in 1,000 of all children) will require medical intervention

-A port-wine stain, a type of vascular birthmark, occurs in 3 of 1,000 infants.

Cryosurgery (cryotherapy): is the application of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue. The term comes from the Greek words cryo (κρύο) ("icy cold") and surgery (cheirourgiki - χειρουργική) meaning "hand work" or "handiwork". Cryosurgery has been historically used to treat a number of diseases and disorders, especially a variety of benign and malignant skin conditions.

Cyst Removal: A cyst is a closed sac having a distinct membrane and division on the nearby tissue. It may contain air, fluids, or semi-solid material. A collection of pus is called an abscess, not a cyst. Once formed, a cyst could go away on its own or may have to be removed through surgery.

Dermatitis: is a blanket term meaning "inflammation of the skin" (e.g. rash). There are several different types of dermatitis. The different kinds usually have in common an allergic reaction to specific allergens. The term may be used to refer to eczema, which is also known as dermatitis eczema or eczematous dermatitis. A diagnosis of eczema often implies atopic dermatitis (childhood eczema), but without proper context, it means nothing more than a "rash".

Eczema: Eczema is a disease in a form of dermatitis, or inflammationof the epidermis.The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions. These include dryness and recurring skin rashes that are characterized by one or more of these symptoms: redness, skin edema (swelling), itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding. Areas of temporary skin discoloration may appear and are sometimes due to healed lesions. Scratching open a healing lesion may result in scarring. Eczema may be confused with urticaria. In contrast to psoriasis, eczema is often likely to be found on the flexor aspect of joints.

Maligant Melanoma: is a malignant tumor of melanocytes which are found predominantly in skin but also in the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). It is one of the less common types of skin cancer but causes the majority (75%) of skin cancer related deaths.Melanocytes are normally present in skin, being responsible for the production of the dark pigment melanin. Despite many years of intensive laboratory and clinical research, the greatest chance of cure is in the early surgical resection of thin tumours.

Moles: A melanocytic nevus (also known as a "Banal nevus," and "Nevocytic nevus":) is a type of lesion that contains nevus cells.Some sources equate the term mole with "melanocytic nevus". Other sources reserve the term "mole" for other purposes.According to the American Academy of Dermatology, the majority of moles appear during the first two decades of a person's life, while about one in every 100 babies is born with moles. Acquired moles are a form of benign neoplasm, while congenital moles, or congenital nevi, are considered a minor malformation or hamartoma and may be at a higher risk for melanoma. A mole can be either subdermal (under the skin) or a pigmented growth on the skin, formed mostly of a type of cell known as a melanocyte. The high concentration of the body's pigmenting agent, melanin, is responsible for their dark color. Moles are a member of the family of skin lesions known as nevi.

Nail Diseases: Nail diseases are distinct from diseases of the skin. Although nails are a skin appendage, they have their own signs and symptoms which may relate to other medical conditions. Nail conditions that show signs of infection or inflammation require medical assistance and cannot be treated at a beauty parlor. Deformity or disease of the nails may be referred to as onychosis.

Psoriasis: is a chronic, non-infectious disease that affects mainly the skin. It is currently suspected to be autoimmune in origin. It commonly causes red, scaly patches to appear on the skin, although some patients have no dermatological symptoms. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes on a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp, palms of hands and soles of feet, and genitals. In contrast to eczema, psoriasis is more likely to be found on the extensor aspect of the joint.The disorder is a chronic recurring condition that varies in severity from minor localized patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis.The cause of psoriasis is not exact, but it is believed to have a genetic component and it can be be triggered by a prolonged injury to the skin. Factors that may aggravate psoriasis include stress, withdrawal of systemic corticosteroid, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking. There are many treatments available, but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat.

Rashes: A rash is a change of the skin which affects its color, appearance or texture. A rash may be localized in one part of the body, or affect all the skin. Rashes may cause the skin to change color, itch, become warm, bumpy, dry, cracked or blistered, swell and may be painful. The causes, and therefore treatments for rashes, vary widely. Diagnosis must take into account such things as the appearance of the rash, other symptoms, what the patient may have been exposed to, occupation, and occurrence in family members. The diagnosis may confirm any number of conditions.The presence of a rash may aid associated signs and symptoms are diagnostic of certain diseases. For example, the rash in measles is an erythematous, maculopapular rash that begins a few days after the fever starts. It classically starts at the head and spreads downwards.

Seborrheic Keratosis: A seborrheic keratosis (also known as "Seborrheic verruca," and "Senile wart" is a noncancerous benign skin growth that originates in keratinocytes. Like liver spots, seborrheic keratoses are seen more often as people age. In fact they are sometimes humorously referred to as the "barnacles of old age".

They appear in various colors, from light tan to black. They are round or oval, feel flat or slightly elevated (like the scab from a healing wound), and range in size from very small to more than 2.5 centimetres (1.0 in) across.They can resemble warts, though they have no viral origins. They can also resemble melanoma skin cancer, though they are unrelated to melanoma as well. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted on" appearance. Some dermatologists refer to seborrheic keratoses as "seborrheic warts", however these lesions are usually not associated with HPV, and therefore such nomenclature should be discouraged.

Skin Cancer Surgery: Excisional skin surgery is a surgical procedure used to remove moles, cysts, skin cancer, and other skin growths using local anesthesia. To treat skin cancer, the doctor uses a scalpel to remove the entire tumor and some of the healthy tissue around it.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma: In medicine, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a form of cancer of the carcinoma type that may occur in many different organs, including the skin, lips, mouth, esophagus, urinary bladder, prostate, lungs, vagina, and cervix. It is a malignant tumor of squamous epithelium (epithelium that shows squamous cell differentiation).

Vitiligo: is a chronic disorder that causes depigmentation in patches of skin. It occurs when the melanocytes, the cells responsible for skin pigmentation which are derived from the neural crest, die or are unable to function. The precise pathogenesis, or cause, of vitiligo is complex and not yet fully understood. There is some evidence suggesting it is caused by a combination of autoimmune, genetic, and environmental factors. It is also common in people with thyroid disorders. The population incidence worldwide is considered to be less than 1 percent. Non-segmental vitiligo has a greater prevalence than the disorder's other form(s).

Warts: A wart (also known as a verruca when occurring on the sole of the foot or on toes) is generally a small, rough tumor, typically on hands and feet but often other locations, that can resemble a cauliflower or a solid blister. Warts are common, and are caused by a viral infection, specifically by the human papillomavirus (HPV)[1] and are contagious when in contact with the skin of an infected person. It is also possible to get warts from using towels or other objects used by an infected person. They typically disappear after a few months but can last for years and can recur.